Archaic Greek in the Modern World

An endangered Greek dialect which is spoken in north-eastern Turkey has been identified by researchers as a "linguistic goldmine" because of its startling closeness to the ancient language, as Cambridge researcher Dr Ioanna Sitaridou explains. https://www.greecehighdefinition.com/blog/2017/5/26/archaic-greek-in-a-modern-world

Hittite Spring Equinox: Purulli Festival

“Let the land prosper and thrive, and let the land be protected”…..from the myth of the Illuyanka. Spring equinox was  celebrated as a fertility ritual  in the Land of the Hatti.  The celebration of these rites were reflected on some rock reliefs that were discovered  in Ancient Anatolia. 

Hittite Spring Equinox: Purulli Festival

“Let the land prosper and thrive, and let the land be protected”.....from the myth of the Illuyanka. Spring equinox was  celebrated as a fertility ritual  in the Land of the Hatti.  The celebration of these rites were reflected on some rock reliefs that were discovered  in Ancient Anatolia.  A cuneiform tablet found during the excavations contains... Continue Reading →

Strolling through Beyoglu-Istiklal Caddesi (Old Pera) There are two versions for the origin of the name Beyoglu, which in Turkish means “Son of a Prince”. One version has it that the name stems from that of Alexius Comnenus, son of Prince Alexander of Trebizond. After Trebizond fell to the Turks in 1461, Fatih brought Alexius... Continue Reading →

From Romulus & Remus to St. Valentine’s Day

Constantinople had its own distinctive holidays, including some with pre-Christian overtones that lingered well into the Middle Ages. Each new year began with Calends on january 1-4, when residents hung laurel wreaths on doors, held costumed parades, and exchanged gifts. The ancient feast of Bota on january 3 originally involved public prayers and sacrifices with... Continue Reading →

From the Nile to the Bosphorus

                                                                                      Myths do travel as long as people wander The Bosphorus, known as the Istanbul Strait is a strait that forms the boundary between the Thrace and Anatolian sections of Turkey. The ancient writers state that the Bosphorus derived its name from the passage of Io in the shape of a cow. The story of... Continue Reading →

From Byzantium to Ephesus in five days

From Byzantium to Ephesus in five days Sevil ! Simply, The Best! My husband and I have toured the world and have hired guides for most of our journeys. Sevil has been one of the best. Highly educated, informative, flexible and accommodating, warm and friendly, Sevil made our touring of Istanbul and Ephesus magical, easy... Continue Reading →

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